Live Review: All Them Witches – Gullivers, Manchester 29/2/16

A lot of questions are raised over the future of the music industry. Some say that all hope is gone and true talent never seems to get through the deluge of faceless cash cows. Others say it’s always been like this and you need to really stop looking at the bigger picture and peer through the cracks in between so to speak. No others prove the latter to be true than Nashville four piece All Them Witches. By seemingly channeling the delta blues through a voodoo ritual, everything about them is exciting, even the 10 minute long extended jam songs.

In a small, sold out room, where the heat adds to that delta vibe they bring forth with their rock sermons, the crowd have bode their time and now want to experience live, what they’ve heard through speakers or headphones for the past four years. This is All Them Witches’ first adventure into European territory, and the majority of it is sold out, which speaks volumes alone for a band you’ve probably been missing out on for so long. All Them Witches are the kind of band you wish to have every success, but at the same time the selfish part of you wants them to remain your (and the other 100 or so people) hidden gem.

Making their way through the crowd, almost camouflaged amongst the ruckus, the band take to the stage and instantly the room changes from expectant to observant. The opening of ‘The Marriage of Coyote Woman’, a cut from 2013’s spectacular ‘Lightning At The Door’, showcases exactly what they do best, with a slow start that drives a solid blues riff until all hell breaks loose and then, as unassumingly as it started, it ends. This continues throughout the majority of the set, with the biggest crowd responses saved for two cuts from the aforementioned release. ‘When God Comes Back’ somehow manages to source even more power than the studio version, with bassist and singer Charles Michael Parks Jr attempting to potentially loosen the mortar holding the venue up with his thunderous (and that’s an understatement) bass sound.

Charles William is a song name you probably don’t recognise but you’ll potentially have a brief flicker of remembrance in the riff that carries it. One thing’s for sure, once you see it live it’s a whole other beast. Parks Jr has the ability to use his bass almost as an extension of his body, even when the effects board he uses decides it’s not thirsty and doesn’t want to work. The rest of the band are equally as savage with their instruments. These aren’t simply four musicians, that would be too much of an injustice to what they do. Whichever deity they sold their souls to in order to create such fluid and ferocious music should be pleased with itself.

Steven Loftin

Steven Loftin

A music nerd who collects, produces, listens and writes.
Steven Loftin